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CERVICAL CANCER

INCIDENCE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY

In the United States, about 12,900 cases of invasive cervical cancer are diagnosed each year and 50,000 cases of carcinoma in situ are detected by Pap smear. Cervical cancer kills 4100 women a year, 85% of whom never had a Pap smear. It is a major cause of disease in underdeveloped countries and is more common in lower socioeconomic groups, in women with early sexual activity and/or multiple sexual partners, and in smokers. Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are the major types associated with cervical cancer. The virus attacks the G1 checkpoint of the cell cycle; its E7 protein binds and inactivates Rb protein, and E6 induces the degradation of p53. Risk factors include a large number of sexual partners, early age at first intercourse, a history of venereal disease, HIV infection, and heavy smoking.

SCREENING

Women should begin screening when they begin sexual activity or at age 20. After two consecutive negative annual Pap smears, the test should be repeated every 3 years. Abnormal smears dictate the need for a cervical biopsy, usually under colposcopy, with the cervix painted with 3% acetic acid, which shows abnormal areas as white patches. If there is evidence of carcinoma in situ, a cone biopsy is performed, which is therapeutic.

PREVENTION

Women, men, and children age 9–26 should obtain vaccination with Gardasil to prevent infection with two serotypes of virus (16 and 18) that cause 70% of the cervical cancer in the United States.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION

Pts present with abnormal bleeding or postcoital spotting or menometrorrhagia or intermenstrual bleeding. Vaginal discharge, low back pain, and urinary symptoms also may be present.

STAGING

Staging is clinical and consists of a pelvic examination under anesthesia with cystoscopy and proctoscopy. Chest x-ray, IV pyelography, and abdominal CT are used to search for metastases. The staging system and its influence on prognosis are shown in Table 73-1. At presentation, 47% of pts are stage I, 28% are stage II, 21% are stage III, and 4% are stage IV.

Treatment

Carcinoma in situ is cured with cone biopsy. Stage I disease may be treated with radical hysterectomy or radiation therapy. Stages II–IV disease are usually treated with radiation therapy, often with both brachytherapy and teletherapy, or combined-modality therapy. Pelvic exenteration is used uncommonly to control the disease, especially in the setting of centrally recurrent or persistent disease. Women with locally advanced (stage IIB–IVA) disease usually receive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The chemotherapy acts as a radiosensitizer. Hydroxyurea, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), and cisplatin have all shown promising results given concurrently with radiation therapy. Cisplatin, 75 mg/m2 IV over 4 h on day 1, and 5FU, 4 g given by 96-h infusion on days 1–5 of radiation therapy, is a common regimen. Relapse rates are reduced 30–50% by such therapy. Advanced-stage disease is treated palliatively with single agents (cisplatin, irinotecan, ifosfamide). Bevacizumab may improve the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

Outline

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Citation

Loscalzo, Joseph, et al., editors. "CERVICAL CANCER." Harrison's Manual of Medicine, 19th ed., McGraw Hill Inc., 2017. harrisons.unboundmedicine.com/harrisons/view/Harrisons-Manual-of-Medicine/623615/all/CERVICAL_CANCER.
CERVICAL CANCER. In: Loscalzo J, Jameson JL, Longo DL, et al, eds. Harrison's Manual of Medicine. 19th ed. McGraw Hill Inc.; 2017. https://harrisons.unboundmedicine.com/harrisons/view/Harrisons-Manual-of-Medicine/623615/all/CERVICAL_CANCER. Accessed April 21, 2019.
CERVICAL CANCER. (2017). In Loscalzo, J., Jameson, J. L., Longo, D. L., Hauser, S. L., Fauci, A. S., & Kasper, D. L. (Eds.), Harrison's Manual of Medicine. Available from https://harrisons.unboundmedicine.com/harrisons/view/Harrisons-Manual-of-Medicine/623615/all/CERVICAL_CANCER
CERVICAL CANCER [Internet]. In: Loscalzo J, Jameson JL, Longo DL, Hauser SL, Fauci AS, Kasper DL, editors. Harrison's Manual of Medicine. McGraw Hill Inc.; 2017. [cited 2019 April 21]. Available from: https://harrisons.unboundmedicine.com/harrisons/view/Harrisons-Manual-of-Medicine/623615/all/CERVICAL_CANCER.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - ELEC T1 - CERVICAL CANCER ID - 623615 ED - Loscalzo,Joseph, ED - Jameson,J Larry, ED - Longo,Dan L, ED - Hauser,Stephen L, ED - Fauci,Anthony S, ED - Kasper,Dennis L, BT - Harrison's Manual of Medicine UR - https://harrisons.unboundmedicine.com/harrisons/view/Harrisons-Manual-of-Medicine/623615/all/CERVICAL_CANCER PB - McGraw Hill Inc. ET - 19 DB - Harrison's Manual of Medicine DP - Unbound Medicine ER -