CONSTIPATION

Defined as decrease in frequency of stools to <1 per week or difficulty in defecation; may result in abdominal pain, distention, and fecal impaction, with consequent obstruction or, rarely, perforation. Constipation is a frequent and often subjective complaint. Contributory factors may include inactivity, low-fiber diet, and inadequate allotment of time for defecation.

SPECIFIC CAUSES

Altered colonic motility due to neurologic dysfunction (diabetes mellitus, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Chagas’ disease, Hirschsprung’s disease, chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, idiopathic megacolon), scleroderma, drugs (esp. anticholinergic agents, opiates, aluminum- or calcium-based antacids, calcium channel blockers, iron supplements, sucralfate), hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, hypokalemia, hypercalcemia, dehydration, mechanical causes (colorectal tumors, diverticulitis, volvulus, hernias, intussusception), and anorectal pain (from fissures, hemorrhoids, abscesses, or proctitis) leading to retention, constipation, and fecal impaction.

Treatment: Constipation

A management approach is shown in Fig. 42-3. In the absence of identifiable cause, constipation may improve with reassurance, exercise, increased dietary fiber, bulking agents (e.g., psyllium), and increased fluid intake. Specific therapies include removal of bowel obstruction (fecalith, tumor), discontinuance of nonessential hypomotility agents (esp. aluminum or calcium-containing antacids, opiates), or substitution of magnesium-based antacids for aluminum-based antacids. For symptomatic relief, magnesium-containing agents or other cathartics are occasionally needed. With severe hypo- or dysmotility or in the presence of opiates, osmotically active agents (e.g., oral lactulose, intestinal polyethylene glycol–containing lavage solutions) and oral or rectal emollient laxatives (e.g., docusate salts) and mineral oil are most effective.

FIGURE 42-3
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Algorithm for the management of constipation. abd, abdominal.

Outline

CONSTIPATIONis the Harrison's Manual of Medicine Word of the day!